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Can the TWIKITOOLNAME variable be changed without causing havoc? (I tried it in my site's TWikiPreferences and didn't see any immediate problems. I was surprised I could change it, actually.)

Is there an accepted policy or guideline to doing that?

Here's why I ask. The name "TWiki" shows up all over the place: web page titles (and therefore bookmarks), in page headers, etc. As much as I like TWiki and am happy to promote it, my users don't want to know it exists. At Wesleyan University, where I am installing TWiki, there's a sort of running joke where names of things get prefixed with "Wes", so I thought it made sense to call our TWiki site "WesWiki". That got me playing around with the preferences and templates, and I realized that TWiki doesn't really have a concept of site -- there's the tool TWiki, which prefixes so many things, and there are individual webs underneath, but there's nothing identifying the site. This seems wrong. A "powered by TWiki" logo and pointers to pages describing the technology and its source seem sufficient. Most other things should have a site-level name. My webs are subsets of WesWiki not the TWiki tool (e.g., WesWiki.Life, WesWiki.Technology, WesWiki.Science, etc.).

Am I missing something here? Is this way off base? Should I try it and see how much I have to change to make this work? Have other people tried something like this?

-- MitchellModel - 03 Oct 2002

I think there should be a different variable for the site name - changing the tool name in TWiki.cfg to your site name is possible but you end up with lots of places where the word TWiki (the tool) should be used but your site name is instead. See http://donkin.org/ for an example.

-- RichardDonkin - 14 Oct 2002

Another answer is at CanIChangeTWikiToolName.

-- MitchellModel - 14 Oct 2002

Admins should be able to change the tool name, that was the point of introducing the variable. However, the TWiki docs are inconsistent, there are still too many places where the variable is used but the TWiki engine is meant. This needs to be fixed.

BTW, if you have a WikiWord for your tool name you get unwanted question mark links. You can escape the tool name like Wes<nop>Wiki.

-- PeterThoeny - 14 Oct 2002

Tried it, but maybe that's not the best way to go either -- I just got email from a new registration which had Wes<nop>Wiki in the subject line and a few other places, and I'm worried that the nop will showup in other places. I tried putting a space -- Wes Wiki but then the words broke up in the WebHome web table. Maybe I'll try a nbsp.... Seriously, what have other people done (other than simply avoiding compound words for the tool name)?

-- MitchellModel - 16 Oct 2002

All scripts should filer out <nop> tags. The register script had that missing. Is now fixed and in TWikiAlphaRelease.

-- PeterThoeny - 20 Oct 2002

Just did that with a stock CairoRelease to set a reasonable site name. But as the variable name implies, it's used all over the place to mean TWiki, the tool. Sometimes makes funny reading. Is it enough to just ReversePageTitle, or are there are other locations, where you need %WIKITOOLNAME to mean the site?
-- PeterKlausner - 20 Oct 2004

For quite a while, I have used this format for WIKITOOLNAME: Mysitename.Wiki. For example, for my site I use "Skyloom.Wiki." With more than a year using this format, I have found it works and makes sense in pretty much all cases. It conveys both the site (my site name) and the tool (wiki).

-- LynnwoodBrown - 20 Oct 2004

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Topic revision: r9 - 2008-09-11 - TWikiJanitor
 
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