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The intent is to be a quick reminder of the features available in Google.

See AboutThesePages.

Please read the #Disclaimer.

See http://www.google.com/help/interpret.html for tips on interpreting the results of a google search.

Contents:

Disclaimer

Most of this information is being "condensed" from pages on http://www.google.com/. (At least, I started to condense them -- needs more work -- much of it is still a verbatim copy so far, with some things deleted. The intent is to be a quick reminder of the features available in Google (especially those of which I was not previously aware). There are still too many words here, and almost all of them are 2001 Google. (I hope to condense this down to a point where it might be considered "fair use" before Google gets upset.)

(This is an example of a page that I might create and keep on my private home TWiki with no worry at all about violating copyright (I think) but might create problems being on my public Wikilearn site. For now I'll leave it here, I may eventually have to remove it. (Not copied on my home site yet.)

Advanced Search Made Easy

Being "condensed" from http://www.google.com/help/refinesearch.html.

  • Include a noise (ignored) word by prefacing it with <space>+. (Noise words are listed after "The following words are very common ..." .)

  • Ignore a word by prefacing it with <space>-.

  • Search for a phrase by enclosing it in quotation marks. (You may need to use a "+" to force inclusion of very common words.)

Note: Google also recognizes hyphens, slashes, periods, equal signs, and apostrophes as phrase connectors. Phrase connectors work like quotes; for example, mother-in-law is treated as a phrase even if the three words aren't in quotes.

  • Use OR to retrieve pages that include either <word A> or <word B>.

  • Limit the search search to a specific domain by adding site:<domain_name> to your query.

Other Advanced Search Features

Some other search features (without examples -- follow the "Learn more ..." link on http://www.google.com/help/refinesearch.html.

  • Language: specify the language to use to display your results.
  • Date: restrict your results to the past three, six, or twelve months.
  • Occurrences: specify where your search terms occur on the page - anywhere on the page, in the title, or in the url.
  • Domains: search only a specific website or exclude that site completely from your search.
  • SafeSearch: Google's SafeSearch screens for sites that contain some types of undesirable information and eliminates them from search results. [Follow the Learn more... link on http://www.google.com/help/refinesearch.html.]

Advanced Search Operators

Being condensed from http://www.google.com/help/operators.html.

Most of this functionality is also available on the Advanced Search page.

  • To see the page that Google has cached, use [cache:] -- example: [cache:www.google.com].
    • To highlight specific words on the cached page, include those words in the query -- example: [cache:www.google.com web] will highlight "web".

  • To find pages with links to a specified page, use the "link" keyword -- example: [link:www.google.com] will list webpages with links to the Google homepage.

  • To find pages "similar" to another page, use the "related" keyword -- example: [related:www.google.com] will list web pages that are similar to the Google homepage. (I don't know what criteria determine similarity.)

  • To see information that Google has stored about a web page, use the "info" keyword -- example: [info:www.google.com] will show information about the Google homepage. (It does not indicate the date the page was indexed.)

  • To spell-check your query (instead of performing it), use the "spell" keyword -- example: [spell: corect my speeling] will provide several possible spell corrections for this query.

Note: The same feature is applied automatically to all queries -- look for words like 'Did you mean: "correct my spelling"' below the search box.

  • To get stock quotes, use the "stocks" keyword -- example: [stock: intc yhoo] will show information about Intel and Yahoo. (You must type the ticker symbols, not the company name.)

Or, search on the stock symbols (e.g. [ intc yhoo ]), then click on the "Show stock quotes" link on the results page.

See also #Stock_Quotes

  • To restrict your search to a specific site (domain), use the "site" keyword -- example: [help site:www.google.com] will find pages about help within www.google.com. [help site:com] will find pages about help within .com urls.

  • To search for words in the titles of documents, use the keyword "intitle" or "allintitle" -- examples:
    • [intitle:google search] will return documents that mention the word "google" in their title, and mention the word "search" anywhere in the document (title or no).
    • [allintitle: google search] will return only documents that have both "google" and "search" in the title.

Putting [intitle:] in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting [allintitle:] at the front of your query: [intitle:google intitle:search] is the same as [allintitle: google search].

  • To search for words in the URL of web pages, use the keyword "inurl" or "allinurl" -- examples:
    • [allintitle: google search] will return only documents that have both "google" and "search" in the url.

< stopped this pass here>

Note that [allinurl:] works on words, not url components. In particular, it ignores punctuation. Thus, [allinurl: foo/bar] will restrict the results to page with the words "foo" and "bar" in the url, but won't require that they be separated by a slash within that url, that they be adjacent, or that they be in that particular word order. There is currently no way to enforce these constraints.

This functionality is also available through Advanced Search page, under Advanced Web Search > Occurrences.

inurl:

If you include [inurl:] in your query, Google will restrict the results to documents containing that word in the url. For instance, [inurl:google search] will return documents that mention the word "google" in their url, and mention the word "search" anywhere in the document (url or no).

[inurl:] works on words, not url components. It ignores punctuation. Thus, in the query [google inurl:foo/bar], the "inurl:" operator will affect only the word "foo", which is the single word following the inurl: operator, and will not affect the word bar. The query [google inurl:foo inurl:bar] can be used to require both "foo" and "bar" to be in the url.

Putting "inurl:" in front of every word in your query is equivalent to putting "allinurl:" at the front of your query: [inurl:google inurl:search] is the same as [allinurl: google search].

2001 Google - Home - All About Google - We're Hiring - Site Map

Google Special Search Features

Being "condensed" from http://www.google.com/help/features.html#sitesearch.

Web Page Translation

If your search has non-English results, there will be a link to a version of that page translated into English.

See the translation FAQ.

PhoneBook

To find listings for a US business, type the business name into the Google search box, along with the city and state. Or type the business name and zip code. Entering the phone number with area code will return a complete business listing.

To find listings for a US residence, type any of the following combinations into the Google search box:

first name (or first initial), last name, city (state is optional) first name (or first initial), last name, state first name (or first initial), last name, area code first name (or first initial), last name, zip code phone number, including area code last name, city, state last name, zip code

To have your residential or business phone and address information removed from the Google PhoneBook, see http://www.google.com/help/features.html#sitesearch.

Google Expands File Type Search

In addition to PDF documents, Google searches Microsoft Office, PostScript, Corel WordPerfect, Lotus 1-2-3, and others. The new file types will simply appear in Google search results whenever they are relevant to the user query.

Google also offers the user the ability to "View as HTML", allowing users to examine the contents of these file formats even if the corresponding application is not installed.

See the file type FAQ (at the google.com site).

If you prefer to see a particular set of results without file types (for example, PDF links), simply type -filetype:[extension] (for example, -filetype:pdf) within the search box along with your search term(s).

Stock Quotes

To get stock and mutual fund information, just enter one or more NYSE, NASDAQ, AMEX, or mutual fund ticker symbols, or the name of a corporation traded on one of the stock indices. If Google recognizes your query as a stock or mutual fund, it will return a link that leads directly to stock and mutual fund information from high quality financial information providers.

See also #stocks:.

Look for the link for your ticker symbol query (e.g. "SUNW") at the top of your search results. If you search on a company name (e.g. "Sun Microsystems"), look for the "Stock Quote:" link on the final line of Google's result for that company's homepage (e.g. www.sun.com).

www.sun.com/ - 31k - Cached - Similar pages - Stock Quote: SUNW <<<

Cached Links

Google takes a snapshot of each page examined as it crawls the web and caches these as a back-up in case the original page is unavailable. If you click on the "Cached" link, you will see the web page as it looked when we indexed it.

The "Cached" link will be missing for sites that have not been indexed, as well as for sites whose owners have requested we not cache their content.

Similar Pages (GoogleScout)

When you click on the "Similar Pages" link for a search result, GoogleScout technology automatically scouts the web for pages that are related to this result.

Find out who links to you

Some words, when followed by a colon, have special meanings to Google. One such word for Google is the link: operator. The query link:siteURL shows you all the pages that point to that URL. For example, link:www.google.com will show you all the pages that point to Google's home page. You cannot combine a link: search with a regular keyword search.

Search a specific site

The word "site" followed by a colon enables you to restrict your search to a specific site. To do this, use the site:sampledomain.com syntax in the Google search box.

I'm Feeling Lucky

The "I'm Feeling Lucky™" button takes you directly to the first web page Google returned for your query.

Search for Dictionary Definitions

Google automatically checks your query for terms which have a dictionary definition -- they are shown as links (i.e., underlined and blue) after the phrase "Searched the web for " near the top of the web page.

Find Maps with Google

To use Google to find street maps, enter a U.S. street address, including zip code or city/ state (e.g. 165 University Ave Palo Alto CA), in the Google search box. Often, the street address and city name will be enough.

2001 Google - Home - All About Google - We're Hiring - Site Map

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Topic revision: r6 - 2001-12-01 - RandyKramer
 
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