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Trying to get straight on the differences (and the implications of those differences) in number of keys on a keyboard — things like pc104, pc102, pc101, 88 ( wink ) — but seriously, what were the older keyboards before they added the numeric keypad on the side?

Is counting the keys a valid method of determining the "size"? Well, I counted 104 keys on my Microsoft Natural Keyboard, so if that is a pc104, counting seems to work (unless I counted wrong).

On a post by Ivan Pascal (IIGTAR — If I Got The Attribution Right) to the xfree86@XFree86PLEASENOSPAM.Org list (ca. 9 Apr 2003), I saw this note (some typos fixed):

The model name "pc101" means a 'standard pc' keyboard with 101 keys. Such a keyboard has no less/greater key (and no MS Window keys too). Thus you specified explicitly that you use a keyboard without the key you need.

Just change it to pc102 ('base' keyboard with '<>' key) or to pc105 (the same but with LeftWin/RightWin/Menu keys). You even can remove this line (XkbModel) because when it is omitted the server use a model with all 105 keys.

I'm mixed up about the less than / greater than keys -- I've never seen a keyboard (IIRC) with separate keys for those -- or is he referring to a foreign language (non US) keyboard or the left and fight arrows? (My greater than and less than keys are the comma and period keys, shifted.)

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  • () RandyKramer - 09 Apr 2003
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Topic revision: r1 - 2003-04-09 - RandyKramer
 
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